friday fav five – 18|08|17

friday fav five – 18|08|17

ALLTHETOOLS edition

1. Favourite FB Live “Unboxing”: Joslin Romphf Dennis Unpacks Her Rolling Studio and BLOWS MY MIND WITH HER SKILZ

Seriously folks: even if you teach in a studio and have all of your teaching resources and tools available to you on the regular? YOU WILL LEARN SOMETHING FROM THIS UNBOXING. #pinkyswear (Also: if you think you’re an organizational genius right now? YOU’RE GOING TO NEED TO RETHINK THAT. #justsayin)

surprised grey and brown tabbie cat

my brain. it just exploded. with sheer awesomeness. 

 

2. Favourite YouTube Video: Five Minute Readiness Routine with Catherine Pavlik that will UNBLOW YOUR MIND (in the best possible way)

What is this? OH JUST A SUPER CHILL READINESS ROUTINE USING EFT TAPPING AND ENERGY DIRECTION TO GET YOU READY TO DO YOUR THANG. #YOUREWELCOME.

large close up of black and grey cat

and now i am focused and ready to roll. or, you know, do the cat things i need to do.

 

3. Favourite Pass-It-Along-To-Your-Students Blog Post: Silent Practice by Christin Coffee Rondeau from Sand Dollar Music

Is one of your singers giving you the business because they were sick so THEY COULDN’T PRACTICE THIS WEEK?! Yeah well, send them this and tell them to stop their whining already. #noexcuses (Also? If that singer comes to their lesson and they can’t make a sound? Nikki Loney over at The Full Voice HAS YOU COVERED.)

blue eyed cat with white whiskers

you are the boss and you can shut that business down and now you have the tools.

 

4. Favourite Voice-Geek-Tastic Webinar Series: 2018 Fall Webinar Series from The Fall Voice Conference

With topics like “Tremors and Quakes: Involuntary Movement Disorders of the Larynx” and “Practical Pharyngeal and Esophageal High Resolution Manometry” this webinar series appeals to the HIGHEST LEVEL OF GEEKERY POSSIBLE. #thatscool

that is a lot of voice geekery right there. and it is making me tired.

 

5. Favourite Think-About-It Blog Series: Reflections on Voice-Related Environments by D. Brian Lee from Vocalability

I love Brian’s thought-FULL words. If you have a beverage that’s waiting to be consumed and a few minutes for reflection, WHY NOT DO THAT THING WITH BRIAN?!

cat and tea cup

this beverage is my favourite thing. i do not want to share it with brian.

And as always … go on and teach your face off.

Go on and find #voicepedme on all the things:

friday fav five – 18|3|16

friday fav five – 18|3|16

let’s have some nearly-the-end-of-march-break* funness

 

1. favourite blog post: The 5-Minute Connection: Teaching the Whole Student by Marisa Gray Atha

Friends, this is a BEAUTIFUL reflection on how and why we teach the whole singer, and includes some practical advice about how to connect with that whole singer in the first five minutes of their lesson.

[I mean, if that blog post didn’t make you want to send flowers to YOUR voice teacher(s), maybe do a quick pulse-check.]

2. favourite FB live: How to Handle Rejection with Joyce DiDonato

I. can’t. even. with how great this FB Live is**. Send it to your students, even if they’re not classical singers and don’t know who Joyce DiDonato is (maybe include a link to her website so they get the picture? I mean, she’s kind of like the Idina Menzel of the opera world, #amiright?***).  If you don’t have twenty minutes, just listen for the first twelve (although, I DARE YOU TO RESIST WATCHING THE REST OF THE AWESOMENESS THAT IS THAT VIDEO).

look, if you didn’t want to learn how to handle rejection, you should have adopted a dog. those slobbery beasts  have no standards whatsoever. they’re so gross.

3. favourite article: The Teacher Curse No One Wants to Talk About by Christopher Reddy

I know, I know: CURSE.  Really? It’s not like your invitation to the ball was dropped in the woods by the horse-back riding messenger on their way to deliver it to you so you show up at the ball and curse ALL THE TEACHERS IN THE WORLD and DOOM THEM TO ETERNAL(ish) SLEEP ON THE EVE OF THE PRINCESS’S SIXTEENTH BIRTHDAY, right? Just ignore the clickbait title and get right to the article. (You know, if you want to know how you’re cursed.)

[Also? There’s a Friday the 13th in April. RELEVANT. THAT IS SO RELEVANT. If you want relevant stuff, write your own blog.]

4. favourite YouTube video: Angelica Hale Singing Girl On Fire on America’s Got Talent ****

Okay. I get cranky when young children sing things they shouldn’t sing and try to sound like adults while doing it. I think we all know that about me by now.THIS? Is not that. Let me count the ways this is not that:

  • appropriate rep (oh man, do I LOVE me some girl-power tunes)
  • sounds like a kid
  • even vibrancy
  • beautiful tuning (for pop singing. don’t you classical singers get all up in my face about the tuning – THAT IS SOME FANTASTIC POP TUNING RIGHT THERE)
  • no evidence of developing tension patterns

YAAASSSS. #thefuturelooksbright

that girl was amazing. and i would like to chew on her sneakers. or the laces at least.

5. favourite webinar: 2018 Fall Voice Webinar Series #1 – Tremors and Quakes: Involuntary Movement Disorders of the Larynx with Mark S. Courey

This is a LOT OF SCIENCY MEDICAL STUFF … but if you’re into that? You’re gonna’ love geeking out on this. (Thanks to Cate Frazier-Neely for the heads up!)

Have a great week and …

You can teach your face off … I can help!

*It’s Friday of the March Break (aka Spring Break, aka a week off school at the end of the winter that a lot of people take advantage of to go somewhere warm or to go skiing but that we are using to renovate our house. We are not fun people.) here in Ontario, Canada.

**#trueconfession: I’m kind of a little bit in FULL ON LOVE with Joyce DiDonato. She seems like a very fun person.

***I have absolutely no idea who to compare Joyce DiDonato to in the CCM world. Like, zero. (Clearly, I am not a fun person.)

**** Yes. I am aware that this video is from, like 2017. I just saw it for the first time this week. I think people have stopped sending me videos of kids singing for fear of how grumpy I am, in general, about this kind of thing. (Because: not a fun person, obviously.)

Teaching (VERY) Young Children – a cheat sheet*

Teaching (VERY) Young Children – a cheat sheet*

CAVEAT:  if you don’t want to teach very young children, THAT’S SUPER-FINE BY ME. You just don’t get to judge those of us who choose to do so. mmmkay? (Also, this particular blog post may not be the one for you. And? If you happen to be of the opinion that teaching young children to sing is somehow detrimental or unhealthy, please take a look at this 2003 position paper by the American Academy of Teachers of Singing. thankyouverymuchokaybye)

And if you’re considering teaching very young children, here are a few things to get you started. Or maybe to give you some new ideas. You know, if you’ve been teaching children for a long time anyway.  Which many of you have. Because: HELLO IDEAL CLIENT FOR MANY INDEPENDENT VOICE TEACHERS.

clearly, i am an ideal cat. however, i am not an ideal cat for every hooman on the planet. because: so fluffy. AND THAT IS OKAY. it is okay to say: I DO NOT WANT A FLUFFY CAT BECAUSE I DO NOT LIKE CLEANING DUST BUNNIES THE SIZE OF TEXAS OUT FROM UNDER MY BED EVERY DAY. AND ALSO: HAIRBALLS. I DO NOT LIKE HAIRBALLS. this does not mean that you get to tell people who DO seem to enjoy cleaning dust bunnies the size of texas out from under their bed every day that they are doing pet ownership wrong. even if they also appear to enjoy cleaning up hairballs. EVEN THEN.

thing the first: resources & curriculum

Look. If you want resources? You should really just stop reading this right now and go over to The Full Voice website. (I know, I KNOW: who tells their blog readers to stop reading? hello …? hellooooo? I’ll just keep going for anyone who may come back. Because: I’m a giver.)  You’re going to find FREE resources over there (you know, if you haven’t already), including downloadables, webinars, a podcast series, and – THE BE-ALL AND END-ALL: a curriculum.

You know. That thing that piano teachers have about a million to choose from? YEAH. THAT. A curriculum that will help you guide your students through learning to read music, learning ear training, learning rhythm training, learning sight singing, tonic sol-fa, etc., etc., ET CETERA. Order the entire teacher package and get a discount. You will not be disappointed. PINKYSWEAR.

what’s this i see? you came back? it was the promise of more cat pictures, wasn’t it? i thought so.

thing the second: community

Guess what? There is an online FaceBook Group (that was started by Nikki Loney (yes … she’s one of The Full Voice people. and, yes … she’s pretty freaking committed to teaching young singers AND to making sure everyone else who wants to has ALL THE THINGS THEY NEED TO DO SO WELL) and Dana Lentini) that is just for people who teach singing to young people. You can ask ANY OLD QUESTION you want (well, maybe not ANY OLD QUESTION … keeping your questions relevant to teaching young singers will most likely NOT result in you getting kicked out of the group so … there’s that) and chances are HIGH you’re going to get some great answers to your question. It’s a super-supportive community for YOU, oh teacher of young singers, and it is called: Voice Teachers for Young Singers. (Because, OF COURSE IT IS.) Go ahead and join up; tell ’em I sent ya’.

we’re the black-tabby-cat-group. see how our name perfectly reflects who we are? we are very smart cats for naming ourselves that.

thing the third: repertoire choices

Okay, so … choosing repertoire for young singers can be tricky. I GET IT (and I also know it’s easy to not do it well) so here are two options options to help:

The Royal Conservatory of Music’s Syllabus:  It’s online. It’s free. It’s downloadable. It’s searchable. It’s been around for, like, a hundred years (ie it’s been tested by teachers for a long time). It’s updated every decade or so (the next one is scheduled to come out in 2019).  AND? There’s TONNES OF CANADIAN CONTENT (y’all know I’m Canadian, right? Check out Donna Rhodenizer‘s stuff especially. It’s kind of the bomb.). What could be better?

Weeelllll … there are perhaps a few things that could be better. Given that the RCM Syllabus tends not to include contemporary music theatre repertoire (and by “tends not to”, I mean “absolutely does not”), or any CCM (that’s Contemporary Commercial Music, not Contemporary Christian Music. Although, the RCM Syllabus doesn’t include any Contemporary Christian Music, either, come to think of it …), you might want to beef up your repertoire choice resources with something like Nate Plummer’s Musical Theatre Repertoire Guide for Kids. I mean, when someone takes the time to organize over three-hundred songs into twelve lists with titles like: “Golden Age for Girls Under 12”? YOU INVEST IN THAT. Because it’s going to make the choosing-repertoire-for-young-singers part of your teaching life SO MUCH EASIER. YES. YES IT IS.

will these e-books make your teaching life easier? YES THEY WILL HOOMAN. WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?

thing the fourth: cultivating appropriate expectations & teaching methods

So, we all know intuitively that a six-year-old is not the same as a sixteen-year-old. But do we know how those differences may change our expectations for that six-year-old or our way of teaching that six-year-old? Because when we teach very young singers, we’re not just teaching little adults. Or, you know, small teenagers, are we? (The correct answer here, in case you’re wondering, is NO. NO, Shannon, we are not.) There are some really wonderful texts out there now that talk through child anatomy and physiology and how that anatomy and physiology (ie the actual vocal instrument) affects our expectations for what children can do. Jenevora Williams’s Teaching Singing to Children and Young Adults is a GREAT resource both for understanding the young vocal instrument and for getting ideas of how to implement that information in your daily teaching. I know, I KNOW: it’s a DVD + Book Combo. Do you even have a DVD player right now? Fear not: she’s written a BUNCH of fantastic articles that don’t require possibly outdated equipment to read. Try THIS ONE for a start.

the more you know, right hooman? you want to know what i wish i knew before i put these glasses on? THAT THEY WERE GOING TO MAKE MY EYES ALL SQUISHY. i wish i’d known that.

 

SO. There you have it. Four things to get you started (or to inspire you further!) on your path to teaching very young children to sing. Unless you don’t want to teach very young children to sing. Which, as we have already discussed, is TOTES FINE. YOU DO YOU AND ALL THAT JAZZ.

You can teach your face off … I can help.

*I thought about calling this post a ‘resource list’. But that doesn’t rhyme. Also: REBELLIOUS.

Pin It on Pinterest